Study Plan for the Bachelor's Degree in Anthropology

 

The Department of Anthropology offers a Bachelor Degree in Anthropology on the completion of the following requirements:

 

First: University Requirements: (27 Credit Hours)

  • University Obligatory Courses: (12 Credit Hours)

 

Credit Hours

Course Title

Course No.

3

Arabic Language (1)

101AL

3

English Language Skills

101EL

3

National Education

102PS

3

Military Sciences

100MILT

3

English Language Skills (pre-requisite)

EL 099

3

Arabic Language (pre-requisite)

AL 099

3

Computer skills (pre-requisite)

COMP 099

 

  • University Elective Courses: (15 Credit Hours)

 

Credit Hours

Course Title

Course No.

3

Media Culture

Hum 101

3

Citizenship and Loyalty

Hum102

3

Islam: Thought and Civilization

Hum 103

3

Art and Behavior

Hum 104

3

Human Rights

Hum 107

3

Thinking Skills

Hum 108

3

 

Hum 109

3

 

Hum 110

3

 

Hum 111

 

 

Hum 112

 

 

Hum 113

 

 

Hum 114

 

 

Hum 115

3

Environment and Public Health``

SCI 101

3

Information Technology and Society

SCI 102

3

Fitness for All

SCI 103

3

Effective Communication Skills

SCI 104

3

Renewable Energy

SCI 105

3

Administration and Community Development

SCI 106

3

Scientific Research

SCI 107

 

Second: College Obligatory Requirements: (18 Credit Hours)

 

Equivalent Course

Credit Hours

Course Title

Course No.

ان 101

3

Introduction to Anthropology

Anth 101

 

3

Introduction to Ethnoarchaeology

ANth 103

اث 101

3

Introduction to Archaeology

Arch 101

اث 102

3

Origins of Civilizations

Arch 102

م.ت 101

3

Introduction to Conservation of Cultural Heritage

Con 101

م.ت 114

3

Introduction to Museum Studies

Con 112

ن.ح 101

3

Computer Skill

sCi 108

             

Third: Department Requirements: (84 Credit Hours)

  • Single Major in Social Anthropology: (84 Credit Hours)
  • Obligatory Courses: (69 Credit Hours)

 

Equivalent Course

Practical

Theoretical

Credit Hours

Course Title

Course No.

ان 108

 

3

3

Development of Social Thought

 111 ANTH

ان 106

 

3

3

Ethnography

 112 ANTH

 

1

2

3

Essentials of Physical Anthropology

 131 ANTH

 

 

3

3

Human Ecology

 133 ANTH

 

 

3

3

Anthropological Research Methods

 212 ANTH

ان 201

 

3

3

Anthropological Thought

 213 ANTH

ان 202

 

3

3

Anthropology of Economics

 215 ANTH

 

1

2

3

Primatology

 231 ANTH

ان 321

1

2

3

Human Evolution

 232 ANTH

ان 220

1

2

3

Osteology

 241 ANTH

ان 310

 

3

3

Family and Kinship

 311 ANTH

 

 

3

3

Contemporary Jordanian Society

 321 ANTH

 

 

3

3

Ethnography of the Arab World

 322 ANTH

 

1

2

3

Anthropological Genetics

 331 ANTH

ان 401

1

2

3

Dental Anthropology

 341 ANTH

ان 419

 

3

3

Medical Anthropology

 343 ANTH

 

 

3

3

Women and Gender

 351 ANTH

ان 429

 

3

3

Applied Anthropology

 421 ANTH

ان 356

 

3

3

Linguistic Anthropology

 425 ANTH

 

6

 

6

Graduation Project in Socio-cultural Anthropology

 429 ANTH

 

 

3

3

Bioarchaeology

 442 ANTH

ان 420

1

2

3

Human Palaeopathology

 445 ANTH

  • Elective Course: (15 Credit Hours)

Students choose 9 credit hours from group1  and 6 credit hours from group 3.

 

  • Single Major in Physical Anthropology: (84 Credit Hours)
  • Obligatory Courses: (69 Credit Hours)

 

Equivalent Course

Practical

Theoretical

Credit Hours

Course Title

Course No.

ان 108

 

3

3

Development of Social Thought

111 ANTH

ان 106

 

3

3

Ethnography

112 ANTH

 

1

2

3

Essentials of Physical Anthropology

131 ANTH

 

 

3

3

Human Ecology

133 ANTH

 

 

3

3

Anthropological Research Methods

212 ANTH

ان 201

 

3

3

Anthropological Thought

213 ANTH

ان 202

 

3

3

Anthropology of Economics

215 ANTH

 

1

2

3

Primatology

231 ANTH

ان 321

1

2

3

Human Evolution

232 ANTH

ان 220

1

2

3

Osteology

241 ANTH

ان 310

 

3

3

Family and Kinship

311 ANTH

 

 

3

3

Contemporary Jordanian Society

321 ANTH

 

 

3

3

Ethnography of the Arab World

322 ANTH

 

1

2

3

Anthropological Genetics

331 ANTH

ان 401

1

2

3

Dental Anthropology

341 ANTH

ان 419

 

3

3

Medical Anthropology

343 ANTH

 

 

3

3

Women and Gender

351 ANTH

ان 429

 

3

3

Applied Anthropology

421 ANTH

ان 356

 

3

3

Linguistic Anthropology

425 ANTH

 

6

 

6

Field Applications of Physical Anthropology

430 ANTH

 

 

3

3

Bioarchaeology

442 ANTH

ان 420

1

2

3

Human Palaeopathology

445 ANTH

 

  • Elective Course: (15 Credit Hours)

Students choose 9 credit hours from group 1 and 6 credit hours from group 3.

  • Group 1: Social Anthropology (9 Credit Hours)

Equivalent Course

Practical

Theoretical

Credit Hours

Course Title

Course No.

ان 331

 

3

3

Globalization and Social Change

325 ANTH

ان 285

 

3

3

Folklore

327 ANTH

ان 301

 

3

3

Anthropology of Development

328 ANTH

ان 342

 

3

3

Anthropology of Politics

422 ANTH

ان 341

 

3

3

Anthropology of Urban Societies

426 ANTH

ان 475

 

3

3

Anthropology of Communication and New Media

427 ANTH

 

 

3

3

Selected Topics in Social Anthropology

485 ANTH

 

  • Group 2: Physical Anthropology (9 Credit Hours)

 

Equivalent Course

Practical

Theoretical

Credit Hours

Course Title

Course No.

ان 254

 

3

3

Human Adaptation

 332 ANTH

 

 

3

3

Biological History of the People of Levant

 344 ANTH

 

 

3

3

Nutrition of Ancient Societies

363 ANTH

ان 351

 

3

3

Settlement and Domestication

 366 ANTH

ان 469

1

2

3

Forensic Anthropology

 446 ANTH

 

1

2

3

Modern Techniques in Physical Anthropology

 461 ANTH

 

1

2

3

Selected Topics in Physical Anthropology

 495 ANTH

 

  • Group 3: (6 Credit Hours)

Equivalent Course

Practical

Theoretical

Credit Hours

Course Title

Course No.

 

 

3

3

Anthropology of the Middle East

 324 ANTH

ان 371

 

3

3

Anthropology of Bedouin and Nomads

 326 ANTH

 

 

3

3

Biology and Culture of Ancient Egyptians

 345 ANTH

 

 

3

3

Anthropology of Violence

 352 ANTH

ان 381

 

3

3

Citizenship and Identity

 356 ANTH

ان 211

 

3

3

Burial Customs of Ancient Societies

 364 ANTH

 

  • Major in Social Anthropology (63 Credit Hours)
  • Obligatory Courses: (57 Credit Hours)

 

Equivalent Course

Practical

Theoretical

Credit Hours

Course Title

Course No.

ان 108

 

3

3

Development of Social Thought

111 ANTH

ان 106

 

3

3

Ethnography

112 ANTH

 

1

2

3

Essentials of Physical Anthropology

131 ANTH

 

 

3

3

Human Ecology

133 ANTH

 

 

3

3

Anthropological Research Methods

212 ANTH

ان 201

 

3

3

Anthropological Thought

213 ANTH

ان 202

 

3

3

Anthropology of Economics

215 ANTH

 

1

2

3

Primatology

231 ANTH

ان 321

1

2

3

Human Evolution

232 ANTH

ان 200

1

2

3

Osteology

241 ANTH

ان 310

 

3

3

Family and Kinship

311 ANTH

 

 

3

3

Contemporary Jordanian Society

321 ANTH

 

1

2

3

Anthropological Genetics

331 ANTH

ان 429

 

3

3

Applied Anthropology

421 ANTH

ان 356

 

3

3

Linguistic Anthropology

425 ANTH

 

6

 

6

Graduation Project in Socio-cultural Anthropology

429 ANTH

 

 

3

3

Bioarchaeology

442 ANTH

ان 420

1

2

3

Human Palaeopathology

ANTH445

  • Elective Course: (6 Credit Hours)

Students choose 3 credit hours from group 1 and 3 credit hours from group 3.

 

  1. Major in Physical Anthropology (63 Credit Hours)
  • Obligatory Courses: (57 Credit Hours)

 

Equivalent Course

Practical

Theoretical

Credit Hours

Course Title

Course No.

ان 108

 

3

3

Development of Social Thought

 111 ANTH

ان 106

 

3

3

Ethnography

 112 ANTH

 

1

2

3

Essentials of Physical Anthropology

 131 ANTH

 

 

3

3

Human Ecology

 133 ANTH

 

 

3

3

Anthropological Research Methods

 212 ANTH

ان 201

 

3

3

Anthropological Thought

 213 ANTH

ان 202

 

3

3

Anthropology of Economics

 215 ANTH

 

1

2

3

Primatology

 231 ANTH

ان 321

1

2

3

Human Evolution

 232 ANTH

ان 200

1

2

3

Osteology

 241 ANTH

ان 310

 

3

3

Family and Kinship

 311 ANTH

 

 

3

3

Contemporary Jordanian Society

 321 ANTH

 

1

2

3

Anthropological Genetics

 331 ANTH

ان 429

 

3

3

Applied Anthropology

 421 ANTH

ان 356

 

3

3

Linguistic Anthropology

 425 ANTH

 

6

 

6

Field Applications of Physical Anthropology

 430 ANTH

 

 

3

3

Bioarchaeology

 442 ANTH

ان 420

1

2

3

Human Palaeopathology

ANTH 445

 

  • Elective Course: (6 Credit Hours)

Students choose 3 credit hours from group 2 and 3 credit hours from group 3.

  • Group 1: Social Anthropology (3 Credit Hours)

Equivalent Course

Practical

Theoretical

Credit Hours

Course Title

Course No.

ان 331

 

3

3

Globalization and Social Change

325 ANTH

ان 285

 

3

3

Folklore

327 ANTH

ان 341

 

3

3

Anthropology of Urban Societies

426 ANTH

 

 

3

3

Selected Topics in Social Anthropology

485 ANTH

 

  • Group 2: Physical Anthropology (3 Credit Hours)

Equivalent Course

Practical

Theoretical

Credit Hours

Course Title

Course No.

ان 245

 

3

3

Human Adaptation

 332 ANTH

 

 

3

3

Biological History of the People of Levant

 344 ANTH

ان 469

1

2

3

Forensic Anthropology

 446 ANTH

 

1

2

3

Selected Topics in Physical Anthropology

 495 ANTH

 

  • Group 3: (3 Credit Hours)

 

Equivalent Course

Practical

Theoretical

Credit Hours

Course Title

Course No.

 

 

3

3

Anthropology of the Middle East

 324 ANTH

 

 

3

3

Biology and Culture of Ancient Egyptians

 345 ANTH

ان 381

 

3

3

Citizenship and Identity

 356 ANTH

ان 351

 

3

3

Settlement and Domestication

ANTH 365

 

  1. Minor in Anthropology (21 Credit Hours)
  2. Obligatory Courses: (15 Credit Hours)

 

Equivalent Course

Practical

Theoretical

Credit Hours

Course Title

Course No.

ان 108

 

3

3

Development of Social Thought

111 ANTH

ان 106

 

3

3

Ethnography

112 ANTH

 

1

2

3

Essentials of Physical Anthropology

131 ANTH

ان 201

 

3

3

Anthropological Research Methods

212 ANTH

ان 220

 

3

3

Anthropological Thought

213 ANTH

ان 108

1

2

3

Osteology

241 ANTH

 

  1. Elective Course: (6 Credit Hours)

 

Equivalent Course

Practical

Theoretical

Credit Hours

Course Title

Course No.

ان 331

 

3

3

Globalization and Social Change

325 ANTH

 

1

2

3

Anthropological Genetics

331 ANTH

ان 342

 

3

3

Anthropology of Politics

422 ANTH

ان 420

1

2

3

Human Palaeopathology

ANTH 445

 

 

3

3

Selected Topics in Social Anthropology

485 ANTH

 

 

3

3

Selected Topics in Physical Anthropology

495 ANTH

 

Students with major in anthropology can choose minor from the following: Archaeology, Biological Sciences, Sociology, History, Shari’a, English, Law, Media, and Modern Languages.

 

 

Course Description Course Outcome

 

ANTH 101      Introduction to Anthropology.

 

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the field of anthropology in both of its main divisions: Socio\cultural anthropology which discusses the social aspects of human societies such as social structure, customs and traditional beliefs and practices of social systems. The other division of anthropology is biological which discusses the biological aspects of human societies such as human variation, adaptation, evolution and importance of human skeletal studies.

 

Outcomes:

 

-       The ability for students to define the concept of culture and its components.

-       To recognize the rule of the ecological economic and historical factors that affect the culture and its transformation

-       For students to understand the relationship between having a culture and to differentiation of people organically and physically from other creatures.

-       To identify the field of anthropology and its distinguished methodologies.

 

 

ANTH 103      Introduction to Ethnoarchaeology.

 

The purpose of this course is to make the student aware of the relationship between Archaeology and Anthropology in general, and Ethnography in particular, in an attempt to show how ethnographic description is used to understand the past in a more genuine way, a matter that gives archaeologists a better understanding of the behavior and culture of the past populations. This course also concentrates on the types analogy between past and present, for the purpose of determining the differences and similarities between the source and the subject.

 

Outcomes:

 

-       Student would be able to define Ethnoarchaeology and the field of studying it.

-       For the student to know how to use Ethno-archeological description to understand the past in a more genuine way.

-       For the student to understand how to use Ethnoarchaeology by archaeologists to give actual explanations to ancient human behaviour and culture.

-       For the student to be able to practice measuring the relationship between past and present for the purpose of determining the differences and similarities between the source and the subject.

 

 

ANTH 111      History of Social Thought.

 

The purpose of this course is to introduce the students to the social thought produced by philosophers and thinkers prior to the emergence of anthropology in the 19th century, and which greatly contributed to the formation of the epistemological and theoretical bases for anthropology as a science. On the other hand, it will enable students to understand the historical roots of anthropology and to distinguish between the concepts of science and thought. It covers some Chinese, Greek, Arabic, and European philosophical texts.

 

Outcomes

 

-       Student would be able to know the notion of "social thought"

-       Student must distinguish between concepts provided by religion, philosophy and science.

-       For student to be aware of the "universality of social thought" that is not confined to a particular culture or civilization.

-       The student has to know how the accumulated social thought paved the way for the emergence of anthropology in the nineteenth century.

 

 

ANTH 112      Ethnography.

 

The purpose of this course is to examine the importance of ethnographic research in anthropology and the anthropological approach in studying and describing human societies. It also enables students to read a series of ethnographies, especially in simple societies, to gain an understanding of what is involved in the process of ethnography from fieldwork to the written account. The course seeks also to help students move in their analysis beyond the ethnocentric view so that they can better appreciate the diversity of cultural practices. Moreover, the course addresses the recent ways of conducting ethnographical anthropology research studies.

 

Outcomes:

 

-       For the student to recognize the historical economical and ecological roots for the culture phenomena.

-       To implement respect in students for other humanitarian cultures as well as cultures that they don't belong to.

-       For the student to get rid of the ethnocentric views.

-       For students to understand the definition of cultural relativity.

 

 

ANTH 131      Essentials of Physical Anthropology 

 

This course aims to introduce students to most vital subjects in physical/biological anthropology. This course also addresses the topics of human evolution, anthropological genetics, blood types, human osteology, dental anthropology, human adaptation and diversity, and primatology. Student through this course would be able to find the relationship between the various topics in biological anthropology.

 

Outcomes:

 

-       For student to know various areas and topics of biological anthropology.

-       For student to show ability identifying and defining the foundations of human evolution, genetics, and factions of the blood, bones, teeth, adaptation and human diversity, and Primatology.

-       For student to be able to connect and understand different subjects and areas in biological anthropology.

 

ANTH 133      Human Ecology

 

This course examines the connection between human and the surrounded physical and social environment. The course focuses on the relationship between the biological and social balance of human’s life. The course as well aims to connect cultural and biological anthropology by focusing on the fact that the human is characterized by the existence of culture.

 

Outcomes

 

-       For student to show knowledge of the relationship between man and his surrounded environment, by emphasizing on its both social and physical parts.

-       For student to recognize the relationship between the biological and social balance of human’s life.

-       Student would be able to find links between the fields of biological and cultural anthropology, by focusing on the fact that Human is characterized by the existence of culture.

 

 

ANTH 212      Research Methods of Anthropology

 

This course aims to introduce students to the notion of science and scientific knowledge, also aims to distinguish scientific knowledge from other cognitive patterns developed by human societies through its long history, through the knowledge of mythological, religious, and philosophical knowledge. The course also addresses the historical context of scientific knowledge. The course also provides a definition of the knowledge production tools, and its fundamental qualitative and quantitative methods. The course devotes a private space for scientific research methodologies developed by anthropology, which is based on qualitative methodologies such as participant observation, participation, discourse analysis and interviews.

 

Outcomes:

 

-       For Student to be able to define the concept of science and its characteristics.

-       Student has to know that the science is a historical phenomenon associated with specific social and cognitive conditions.

-       The student should be able to understand the difference between the concept of knowledge and the concept of science.

-       Student has to distinguish between the concepts of scientific methods and tools of scientific research.

-       The student should be able to define the most important qualitative and quantitative anthropological research tools.

-       The student should know the steps of anthropological scientific research methods.

-       To distinguish between the concepts of "Data”, “Analysis”, and “Interpretation”.

ANTH 213      Anthropological Theories

 

The course aims to introduce some of the significant theoretical framework developed by anthropological thoughts through studying human culture. It seeks to enable students to recognize the basic concepts and theoretical frameworks essential to understand and explain the socio-cultural phenomena being studied. More specifically, the course examines the following anthropological theories: evolutionism, historical, diffusionism, functionalism, structural-functionalism, and culture and personality, in addition to structural linguistic theories, symbolism and postmodernism.

 

Outcomes:

 

-       Student to be able to define the concept of anthropological theory or school.

-       Student would be able to trace the development of anthropological theories in the 19th century until today.

-       Student would be able to form a special anthropological theory of his own.

-       Student should apply one or more anthropological theory in graduation project.

 

 

ANTH 215      Anthropology of Economy

 

This course aims to increase the student knowledge of the various economic systems developed by different cultures throughout history. It also aims to study the affiliation between economic systems and cultural components and other ecological, technological, religious and cognitive systems in any given society. This course focuses on the economic systems in both developed and underdeveloped societies, which both are considered as an outcome of the interaction between culture and physical environment and technology. The course also presents different patterns of community subsistence within diverse historical and ecological contexts where the interactive relationship between economic systems and other political, technical, environmental, historical, religious and social systems become evident.

 

Outcomes:

 

-       The student would be able to develop and anthropological definition of the economic phenomenon.

-       Student would be able to define the economy and the anthropology of economy.

-       To distinguish between primitive and complex economies, and to understand the great diversity in the economic systems developed by communities across time and place.

-       For student to realize the correlation and overlap between the economic systems and social, ecological, political, linguistic and religious phenomena.

 

 

ANTH 231      Primatology

 

This course seeks to introduce students to the importance of the study of primates in anthropology. The course also focuses on the behavior of primates and relationship to the evolution of human behavior. The course deals with the study of ecology and organic evolution through the fossil record and classification of the current types of primates existing in world and their living environment. This would enable student to make a distinction between primate species alive today, their behavior, nutrition, places and way of life.

 

Outcomes:

 

-        Students should realize the importance of primatology in anthropology

-        Student is able to relate the evolution of primate behaviour to the evolution of human behaviour.

-        Student should distinguish between the different species of primates and their behaviour, habitats, and nutrition.

 

ANTH 232      Human Evolution

 

This course aims to introduce the student with different stages of human evolution from the early hominids to the anatomically modern humans. It covers different topics including principles of evolution, Mendelian and molecular genetics and primatology. It addresses the geological time scale and specially the Cenozoic Era and mammalian radiation. The course concentrates on the ecological conditions that influence the emergence of early hominids and their evolution to the modern humans and variation. 

 

 Outcomes:

 

-        Student would understand the principles of cytology, Mendelian genetics and principles of evolution.

-        Students should realize the chronology of the earth.

-        Student would understand the various stages of human evolution.

 

 

ANTH 241      Osteology

 

The course aims to teach the students the different part of the human skeleton. It is practical course that starts with teaching the chemical and histological structure of the bone in addition to the anatomical terminology and focuses on the anthroposcopic and metric measurements of the various skeletal elements for the identification of age, sex, height, racial affinity and pathology. The course includes laboratories exercises and illustrations.

 

Outcomes:

 

-        Student would identify all bones of the human skeleton.

-        Students should realize the chemistry and histology of the bone.

-        Student would understand the anatomy of every bone in the skeleton.

 

 

 

ANTH 311      Family and Kinship

 

This course intends to develop the theoretical frame of the concept of family and to examine the kinship system both descriptively and analytically. It considers the classification, functioning and social network related to the various family and kinship types. On the other hand, it studies the broad concept of kinship, its global diversity, and interaction with legal, ecological, economic, and socio-cultural structures. This course as well studies marriage patterns and their connection to the social, cultural, ecological and economic factors, as well as affinity system, kinship leadership and its legal, political and religious relation.

 

Outcomes

-        Student should define the family concept and kinship phenomenon.

-        Student must be able to differentiate between the biological and social kinship systems.

-        Student ought to understand the meaning of extreme diversity of family forms and kinship systems known in various human societies.

-        Student should be aware of changes and developments that have taken place in the family form, and link these transformations to economic and social change. 

 

 

ANTH 321      Contemporary Jordanian Society

 

This course aims to study the dynamic changes in the Jordanian contemporary society. The course also examines the stages of development of the Jordanian society since its foundation in the modern age and the circumstances that led to that, and the most important political, social and economic components. The course highlights the most important anthropological and social studies conducted on Jordanian society. In addition the course focuses on the ethnic of non-Arab and the religious of non-Muslim communities living in Jordan.

 

Outcomes

 

-         Student should be able to understand the dynamic shift within the contemporary Jordanian society.

-         The student should show knowledge of the development of the Jordanian society since its inception in the modern age and the circumstances that led to that.

-         Student must comprehend the political, social and economic components, which shape the contemporary Jordanian society.

-         Student would be able to detect major problems of the non-Arab and non-Muslim minorities within Jordanian society.

 

 

ANTH 322      Ethnography of the Arab World

 

This course intends to introduce students to the diverse living methods of groups and social and cultural communities residing in the Arab world. This course is designed to provide an ethnographic account of the homogeneity and heterogeneity of the Arab societies. The course provides ethnographic materials including written ethnographic texts, monographs or films to introduce student to the mixture of cultural life in the Arab world. The course also aims to provide ethnographic materials about some new and old sub-cultures in the Arab world.

 

Outcomes

 

-         To introduce student to diverse and rich ethnography of Arab world.

-         For student to understand the large diversity of living life within cultural groups that make up the Arab world.

-         To increase the sensitivity of the student's cognitive relationship between the communities living methods, and between ecosystems, economic, political and historical elements that interchangeably impacted.

-         To increase student acceptance of the idea of cultural diversity.

-         Student would be able to discover the elements of homogeneity and diversity of the culture within the Arab world.

 

 

ANTH 324      Anthropology of the Middle East

 

This course aims to discuss the main aspects of the controversy and debate about the Middle East and to identify the problematic aspects of this term, in addition to the review of ethnographic and ethnological studies relating to these communities the region. This course introduces student to the most important theoretical and cognitive frameworks used in the study of the Middle Eastern societies. In addition it introduces as the student to generalizations and stereotypes used in the study and analysis of the Middle East communities.

 

Outcomes

 

-         Student would be able to know the metaphorical and cultural concepts associated with the Middle East term

-         Student should be familiar with studies and the names of the researchers and theoreticians who studied the Middle East societies.

-         Student should recognize the most important social and cultural qualities that characterize the Middle East societies from all others communities and cultures.

-         The student should define some of the most important heterogeneity and homogeneity factors that characterize the Middle East societies.

 

 

ANTH 325      Globalization and Social Change

 

The aim of this course is to discuss the most prominent aspects of globalization and its relationship to the broad capitalism restructuring process, in addition to the changes and transformations brought about by the emergence and spread of strong influx of globalization in the structures of various social and economic communities, as well as discuss the rapid flow of money, information, technology, goods, and ideology across national boundaries of countries and communities. This course also seeks to identify the different ways in which the forces of Globalization achieve its objectives and the different approaches theses forces use to face local communities.

 

Outcomes

 

-         The student should be able to define the phenomenon of globalization scientifically and anthropologically.

-         Student should be able to identify social change term and relate it to the advancement of the phenomenon of globalization.

-         Student should be able to define some of the theoretical concepts such as capitalism, restructuring, capital outflow, and the flow of goods.

-         Students must be aware of the homogeneity forces generated by globalization, surpassing the privacy factors of the place and culture.

 

 

ANTH 326      Anthropology of Bedouin and Pastoral Communities

 

This course means to introduce students to the notion of Bedouin and pastoral communities, which are both based on mobility and travel. The course also aims to enable student to make theoretical distinction between the pastoral and Bedouin communities. The course focuses also on the ecological, economic and historical factors that have contributed to the creation of nomadic and herding systems. The course provides the student with a set of ethnographic studies on herding and pastoral communities in the Middle East, Asia and Africa.

 

Outcomes

 

-         Student would be able to define the pastoral community and distinguish it from other lifestyles.

-         For student to know how the ecological and economic systems have affected the herding and nomadic communities.

-         For student to read and know some ethnographic models of pastoral and nomadic communities from different parts of the world.

 

 

ANTH 327      Folklore

 

This course aims to increase students' awareness of cultural heritage, and expand the knowledge of cultural, social, political and ecological dynamics, which make up cultural heritage of humankind. This course also seeks to provide distinct definitions of the concept of heritage, and to present visible and invisible cultural elements, which are produced and reproduced collectively by different cultures. It also reviews the progression of discussions about the concept of heritage and folklore and the various implications of the concepts since the beginning of its application in the nineteenth century to the present. The course also focuses on the mutual influence between heritage components and the rest of cultural elements such as language, politics and religion, geography, ecology and history.

 

Outcomes

 

-         Student must develop an anthropological definition of folklore

-         Student must distinguish between the material and immaterial forms of folklore

-         Student must understand the role of ecological, religious, linguistic, and political elements, which contributed to the creation of folklore phenomenon for human societies.

-         Student must know the various usages and applications of folklore.

 

 

ANTH 328      Anthropology of Development

 

This course aims to bring a change in the student’s definition of the concept of development, as its stands for the total processes of economic, social, political, psychological and value. This course will examine the role of development in the community from an ethnographic perspective, looking particularly at key issues such as poverty, and perform a critical analysis, taking into account the point of view of local communities surveyed. The course has been designed from the basic idea is that culture represents a key issue for understanding the development processes. The course also focuses on the role that anthropologists play not only as researchers, but participants and consultants in development projects.

 

Outcomes

 

-         Student must develop an anthropological definition of development concept.

-         Student must learn some of the development theories, such as the theories of modernization and dependency and world order.

-         Student should be familiar terms with the hidden potential that anthropology has at the level of the development of societies.

-         Student should be aware of the internal and external factors that influence the development and underdevelopment of communities.

 

 

ANTH 331      Anthropological Genetics

 

The purpose of this course is to give answers asked by physical anthropologist from genetic perspective. This course covers the basic principles of molecular and population genetics and how to apply these principles in the field of organic anthropology. The course discusses some of the important issues such as human origin, and the population distribution for humans, and genetic differences among them, genetic diseases, and others.

 

Outcomes

 

-         The student shows an understanding of what posed anthropology genetics in general.

-         The student should be able to understand the basic principles of molecular genetics.

-         The student should be able to understand the basic principles of population genetics.

-         The student should be able to discuss some of the topics anthropology genetics.

 

 

ANTH 332      Human Adaptation

 

This course aims to study how the human body adapts to different natural environments, such as settlements in high, cold, warm areas and areas of high humidity.  The course deals with discussing the most important natural forces that cause human body adapt to different environments, such as natural selection, genetic drift and others. And it focuses on explaining the importance of the interaction between man and the environment to reach the anticipated degree of human adaptation in these different environments in antiquity and the present.

 

Outcomes

 

-        The student would understand how the human body adapts to different natural environments, such as settlements in high, cold, warm areas and areas of high humidity.

-        The student should be able to discuss the most important natural forces that cause the human body to adapt to different environments, such as natural selection, genetic drift and others.

-        The student should explain the importance of the interaction between man and the environment to reach the anticipated degree of human adaptation in these different environments in antiquity and the present.

 

 

ANTH 341      Dental Anthropology

 

This course aims to give an introduction to human teeth in terms of their chemical composition, anatomy, development, evolution, histology and the diseases affecting them. It also focuses on archaeological teeth from different periods with exposure to comparative studies on this subject and on how to build the ancient human behavior using the teeth.

 

Outcomes

 

-         To distinguish between categories of human teeth.

-         The student to know the anatomy, chemical composition and the growth of teeth.

-         The student to show his knowledge of dental diseases and tissue surrounding the teeth.

-         The student to extract information from the old anthropological teeth.

-         The student to be able to apply modern techniques to extract information from the anthropological teeth.

-          

 

ANTH 343      Medical Anthropology

 

This course aims to provide an anthropological explanation for the disease, health and medical treatments defined by the relationship between biology, society and culture. And This course covers the most important objectives and directives of medical anthropology and the relationship of cultural factors and ecological health and disease through the study and analysis of traditional folk medicine practices (ritual Zar, magic and sorcery ... etc) and the role of cultural and economic realities, beliefs and traditions in the emergence of psychosomatic and mental illness.

 

Outcomes

 

-         That the student surpassing the traditional common definitions of the concept of health and disease and treatment.

-         The student to define health, therapy and disease as cultural phenomena as they are medical.

-         That the student to know some of the ethnographic models for medical systems in different regions and different cultures of the world.

-         That the student understands vulnerability and effect between the medical systems in communities and between the economic, political and demographic relations systems.

 

 

ANTH 344      Biological History of the People of Levant

 

This course aims to review the history of the health status and genetic characteristics of the people of the southern Levant during ancient times through the skeletons and teeth that are found at archaeological sites. It focuses on the most important archaeological sites in the south of the Levant in which the skeletons and teeth had be studied and the results of these studies. The course discusses the role of environmental factors such as climate, nutrition and culture in shaping the biological reality of these peoples.

 

Outcomes

 

-         The student to review the biological status of the residents of the Levant in antiquity.

-         The student to know the most important bioarchaeological studies of important archaeological sites in the Levant.

-         The student to determine the role of the environment, nutrition and climate in the process of physical and cultural evolution of the population of the Levant.

 

 

ANTH 345      Biology and Culture of Ancient Egyptians

 

This course aims to introduce students to the bioarchaeological history ancient Egyptians between the Badarian period and until the end of the New Kingdom, where the course focuses on the biological and cultural aspects of the Egyptian civilization through what has been accumulated from the huge amount of information from the archaeological sites. The course discusses the most important studies on the skeletons and teeth from archaeological sites in Egypt.

 

Outcomes

 

-         The student to know the biological history of ancient Egypt.

-         The student to determine the biological and cultural aspects of ancient Egypt's population.

-         The student to know perfectly, the most important studies of skeletons and mummies recovered from the Egyptian archaeological sites

 

 

ANTH 351      Women and Gender

 

This course aims to introduce students to the studies on women and gender in terms of its history and evolution. The course also intends to empower students to realize how each culture define the  roles of women and how the historical, economic, social, ecological, and political factors influence these roles. The course offers a review of the most important anthropological theories dealing with women and gender.

Outcomes

 

-         The student should know what gender means.

-         The student should know that gender and women's roles are defined as the product of cultural, historical and religious factors.

-         The student should discover the evolution that human societies had developed in terms of the role of women economically, socially and politically.

-         The student should develop his system of value toward greater acceptance of social, political and economic role of women in his large and small communities.

 

 

ANTH 352      Anthropology of Violence

 

This course aims to address the phenomenon of violence from an anthropological perspective of so that the focus is on economic, social, political, demographic and religious radicals that play a role in the emergence of the phenomenon of violence. The course also teaches the most important forms of violence such as physical violence, psychological violence and symbolic violence. The course also meant to provide some of the most important anthropological theories dealing with the phenomenon of violence. The course focuses on the relationship between the proliferation of narrow identities and the spread of the phenomenon of violence.

 

Outcomes

 

-         The student should be able to formulate anthropological definition of the phenomenon of violence.

-         The student distinguishes between different forms of violence.

-         That the student knows some of the anthropological theories that explain the phenomenon of violence and interpret it.

-         That the student understands the relationship between the prevalence of violence and the dominance of narrow identities of tribal, sectarian, regional and zonal.

 

 

ANTH 356      Citizenship and Identity

 

This course aims to address the phenomenon of citizenship as a newly historically a form of social, legal and political relations between the individual and the community and the community with the state.  It focuses on the implications of legal, political, historical and social concept of the citizen and citizenship. The course traces the development of identity systems developed by human societies throughout its history, from the tribal identity systems to ethnic identity and until reaching to the national identity, which is based on the principle of citizenship. The course gives special attention to the issue of identity and citizenship in the Jordanian society.

 

Outcomes

 

-         That the student has anthropological definitions of the concepts of citizenship and identity.

-         The student knows the historical developments that led to the emergence of the concept of citizenship.

-         The student knows the forces and dynamics that make the identity of the individual and the group.

-         That the system of values of the student ​​evolves toward more universal identity.

-         The student accepts cultural pluralism and multiplicity of cultural identities in his society.

 

 

ANTH 363      Nutrition of Ancient Societies

 

This course aims to address two sides of palaeodiet: the first is to follow the patterns of the palaeodiet from the Paleolithic period, and until the end of the Byzantine period with focus on Jordan as a location, while the second part deals with the methods and techniques in which physical anthropologist can reconstruct the palaeodiet in humans through analyzing skeletons using the trace elements and stable isotopes and microscopic tooth erosion, as well as many indirect methods, such as palaeopathology and dental enamel hypoplasia.

 

Outcomes

 

-         The student to know the food evolution since the emergence of the human to the Byzantine era.

-         The student to reconstruct the palaeodiet using skeletons.

-         The student to reconstruct the palaeodiet using modern techniques.

-         The student to connect between palaeodiet and culture and environment.

 

 

ANTH 364      Burial Customs of Ancient Societies

 

This course aims to track the evolution of burial customs in Jordan through different archaeological periods. It focuses on periods extended since the beginning of settlement in the Jordan until the end of the Byzantine period. The course covers how the anthropological schools of thought schools look at the idea of ​​death and its relation to mortuary practices. The course focuses on how to deal with the deceased person and ways to bury him according to beliefs of ancient peoples and cultures and how to reconstruct that through the cemeteries in the archaeological sites.

 

Outcomes

 

-         The student to track the evolution of burial customs in Jordan through different archaeological periods.

-         The student to understand the relationship between culture and burial customs.

-         The student to understand the interpretation of the funeral rituals and the idea of ​​death using anthropological schools of thought.

 

 

ANTH 366      Settlement and Domestication

 

This course aims to study the most important changes in the lives of human beings as a result of the shift from nomadic hunting and gathering to settled agriculture and animal husbandry. This course focuses on introducing students to the oldest human settlement areas in different regions of the world and the stages of its development. The student also knows the types of plants and animals that have been domesticated and link this process on cultural evolution of man in different historical eras.

 

Outcomes

 

-         The student to notice the most important changes in the lives of human beings as a result of the shift from nomadic hunting and gathering to settled agriculture and animal husbandry.

-         The student to recognize the oldest places of human settlement in the various regions of the world and the stages of its development.

-         The student to identify the different types of plants and animals that have been domesticated and link this process with cultural evolution of man in different historical eras.

 

 

ANTH 421      Applied Anthropology

 

This course introduces the student to the applied uses of anthropology and the role that anthropology can play in terms of solving social problems. The course also teaches the importance of applied anthropology and its curricula, ethics and the circumstances of its inception, and how to employ theoretical and methodological knowledge of anthropology in the study and analysis of many issues of contemporary social problems such as those relating to development, tourism, education and urban problems, also it focuses on the different roles that can be played by anthropologist in projects of applied anthropology as well as to highlight the areas of employment of anthropologists outside the academic framework.

 

Outcomes

 

-         The student knows the applied and practical possibilities offered by the anthropology.

-         The student knows the concept of social or cultural problem.

-         The student knows the most important theories of applied anthropology.

-         The student becomes familiar with some of the most important ethical problems posed by the anthropologist involved in activities of applied anthropology.

 

 

ANTH 422      Anthropology of Politics

 

This course aims to enable the student to define the political field, both in ancient societies that have not known the phenomenon of the modern state, or those who developed state systems. The course also aims to show the development experienced by political phenomenon by addressing political organization in the non-state communities and in communities divisive right up to the central state societies, and also seeks to increase the student's knowledge of the forms of political organizations and diversity in communities by linking the political diversity of forms of economic and religious organization and linguistic ecosystem in human societies.

 

Outcomes

 

-         The student develops a definition of an anthropological implication for political phenomenon.

-         The student distinguishes between field levels or political phenomenon.

-         The student knows some of the most important theories and theorists names in the field of political anthropology.

-         That the student understands the size of extreme diversity in political systems developed by human populations.

-         That the student understands the political phenomenon can influence and be influenced by other components of the culture as religion, language, economy and ecology.

 

 

ANTH 425      Linguistic Anthropology

 

This aims to introduce students to view the language as a tool of communication and understanding as well as a mechanism to re-produce the culture itself.  The course also aims to reveal different aspects of the dialectical relationship between language and the rest of the economic and social systems, culture and kinship and symbolism. The course also aims to focus on language as a system of spoken and written symbols and references and nods and gestures produced by the society.

 

Outcomes

 

-         That student develops a definition that views the language as a tool of communication and understanding as well as a mechanism to re-produce the culture itself.

-         The student distinguishes aspects of the dialectical relationship between language and the rest of the economic and social systems, culture and kinship and symbolism.

-         That the student understands that the language is a system of spoken and written symbols and references and nods and gestures produced by the society.

 

 

ANTH 426      Anthropology of Urban Societies

 

This course seeks to introduce students to the urban phenomenon as an anthropological phenomenon and its evolution over time. The course also seeks to introduce urban anthropology in terms of subject matter and in terms of methodologies and cognitive problems. The course focuses on clarifying theoretically the nature of urban communities, and on studying the problem of the rural – urban link and their overlap in terms of their economic, social and cultural aspects, which has worked to greatly exceed the characteristics of each. It also deals with the characteristics, factors and trends of urbanization and discusses the most important problems of urban life in Jordan and the Arab world.

 

Outcomes

 

-         The student to be able to formulate a definition of the city anthropologically.

-         That the student possesses the keys that enable him to distinguish between the phenomena of the city, the village and the nomadism.

-         The student knows the historical trans forms of the phenomenon of the city.

-         That the student understands interdependence between the phenomenon of the city and between the economic, social and political factors affecting it.

-         The student knows the difficulties faced by the anthropologist as a researcher while studying urban phenomenon.

 

 

ANTH 427      Anthropology of Communication and New Media

 

This course intends to introduce the student to the media and communication as a cultural and social phenomenon and the explanation of the role now played by social media in shaping the social and cultural reality and the picture industry's era. The course deals with the different definitions of the phenomenon of communication, also addresses the total economic, social, political, religious and linguistic factors affecting the phenomenon of communication. The course provides some of the most important anthropological theories that address the phenomenon of communication. The course also deals with new forms of modern media such as social media and digital communication, and the impact all have in the formation of the whole social and cultural phenomena in the current era.

 

Outcomes

 

-         Student must understand the social and cultural elements of communication phenomenon.

-         Student must be able to define the communication phenomenon and its development over time.

-          For student to connect between communication phenomenon and the rest of the various elements of the culture, such as political, economic, religious and linguistic elements.

-         To introduces the student to some of the most important theories in anthropology and sociology that dealt with communication.

 

 

ANTH 429      Graduation Project in Socio-cultural Anthropology

 

This course aims to enable the student to choose a field research project in the field of social/cultural anthropology. This research should be carried out under the supervision of a faculty member in the department. This course trains students on how to complete graduation projects. Students can register for this  course  after taking 60 credit hours of the curriculum plan.

 

Outcomes

 

-         Student should be able to choose a field research project in the field of social and cultural anthropology.

-         Student should carry out a field research project in the field of social and cultural anthropology.

 

 

ANTH 430      Field Applications of Physical Anthropology

 

This course is a practical field course aims to introduce students to how the human and animal bones from archaeological sites being excavated and analyzed. The course focuses on training students in the field of excavation and documentation of archaeological sites containing the skeletal remains. This course is taught in the summer semester after the student has finished 60 credit hours of the study plan.

 

Outcomes

 

- That the student learns the human and animal bones from archaeological sites being excavated and analyzed.

- To practice field excavation and documentation of archaeological sites containing the skeletal remains.

 

 

ANTH 442      Bioarchaeology

 

Students learn through this course on how to study dental and skeletal human remains from archaeological sites and the importance of these studies. The course includes various topics related to how to rebuild the biological status of the old man in terms of health status, medical history, nutritional status, demography, and others.

 

Outcomes

 

-         The student to know how to study the skeletons and teeth extracted from archaeological sites.

-         That the student can interpret the results drawn from the bones and teeth within their archaeological and social context.

-         The student to reconstruct the biological history of the ancient societies.

 

 

ANTH 445      Human Palaeopathology

 

This course aims to study the origin, evolution and spread of diseases that can be observed on the skeletons of past human populations and compare it with contemporary human diseases.  It also aims to study the various factors that led to the emergence of these diseases in time and space, taking into account the role played and being played by culture and natural resources in the emergence and spread of these diseases.

 

Outcomes

 

-         The student to learn the origin, evolution and spread of diseases that can be observed on the skeletons and teeth of past human populations.

-         The student to recognize ancient human diseases that have an impact on the skeleton or teeth.

-         The student to analyze and explain the causes of these diseases and link them with archaeological and social content.

 

 

ANTH 446      Forensic Anthropology

This course aims to provide forensic anthropology as a theory and method. The course deals with how to reveal the incident and the crime scene techniques and how to determine the time since the death. Emphasis through the course will be on how to determine the age, sex, race, height, inherited traits and the cause of death. Students will also learn about facial reconstruction, testimony as an expert, judicial and ethical responsibilities, and writing forensic report.

 

Outcomes

 

-         The student to show an understanding of criminal anthropology theory and method.

-         The student to learn how to reveal the incident and the crime scene techniques and how to determine the time since the death.

-         The student to learn about facial reconstruction, testimony as an expert, judicial and ethical responsibilities, and writing forensic report.

 

 

ANTH 461      Modern Techniques in Physical Anthropology

 

This course aims to introduce the student to the many techniques which recently entered into the field of physical anthropology such as atomic absorption, X-ray diffraction, FTIR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, electron microscopy, and other techniques. The course will focus on the theoretical concept of these techniques and the interpretation of the results and their significance in anthropology membership.

 

Outcomes

 

-         The student is to be introduced the student to the many techniques which recently entered into the field of physical anthropology such as atomic absorption, X-ray diffraction, FTIR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, electron microscopy, and other techniques..

-         The student to show an understanding of the theoretical concept of these techniques and the ability to interpret the results and their significance in the field of physical anthropology.

 

 

ANTH 485      Selected Topics in Social Anthropology

 

This course aims to enable teachers and students to keep up with the latest scientific topics in the field of social anthropology as well as issues that is related to the Arab world or the Jordanian society. The student studies in this course a selected topic in the field of social anthropology that is selected by the teacher. The course deals with topics in the field of social anthropology that are not covered in other courses, those associated with the updated topics in the field of social anthropology.

 

Outcomes

 

-         The student to have a look the latest scientific topics in the field of social anthropology.

-         The student should be able to keep up with the latest scientific topics and techniques in the field of social anthropology.

 

 

ANTH 495      Selected Topics in Physical Anthropology

 

This course aims to enable teachers and students to keep up with the latest scientific topics in the field of physical anthropology as well as issues that is related to the Arab world or the Jordanian society. The student studies in this course a selected topic in the field of physical anthropology that is selected by the teacher. The course deals with topics in the field of physical anthropology that are not covered in other courses, those associated with the updated topics in the field of physical anthropology.

 

Outcomes

 

-         The student to have a look the latest scientific topics in the field of physical anthropology.

-         The student should be able to keep up with the latest scientific topics and techniques in the field of physical anthropology.

 

 

Arch 101 Introduction to Archaeology

This course provides an introduction to the theory, methods and aims of archaeology, in addition to the relation of archaeology to history, art, science and other disciplines. In this course students examine archaeology and professional ethics; archaeology as public interest; and legal organizations of archaeology.

 

Outcomes

-       To know the importance of archaeology

-       To has the know how the archaeology was developed and state its goals

-       To has the theoretical and practical methods of archaeological excavations

-       To explain the relationship between the archaeology and other

 

 

Arch 102 Origins of Civilization

The comparison of origins and institutions of civilizations in the old and new worlds, including the first state-organized societies of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Levant, the Indus Valley, China, the Aegean, Mesoamerica, and Peru

 

Outcomes

 

-       To name the main civilizations that existed in the ancient world

-       To explain the main features of the civilizations in Mesopotamia, Egypt, Levant, China, India, Greece and America.

 

 

CON 101: Introduction to Conservation of Cultural Resources

Course Description:

The aim of this course is to provide students with the basic concepts and knowledge concerning cultural heritage and its deterioration and conservation processes. It explores the definition of heritage and its importance; the deterioration processes and threats facing cultural heritage; the principles and approaches of conservation of cultural resources; the conservation processes; and the planning process for conservation of cultural resources.

 

Outcomes

 

On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

-         Recognize and appreciate the value of heritage and communicate the importance of its preservation and protection.

-         Recognize and classify the main threats and deterioration processes affecting cultural heritage.

-         Explain the key terms and concepts related to conservation of cultural heritage and differentiate between the varied conservation processes.

-         Identify and outline the steps for preparing a proper conservation plan for a cultural heritage site.

-         Communicate effectively by means of writing and presentat

 

 

CON 121: Introduction to Museum Studies

Course Description:

This course aims to introduce the students to the importance of the museum as an educational entertainment institution. The course covers the history of the development of museums and their goals. It also covers the museum administration (human resources) and the role of each individual within the institution. The method of recording and storing archaeological objects, designing show cases, planning exhibitions, and lighting systems are also included in the course. The students will also be taught about the proper museum environment to preserve the archeological artifacts. A practical training on the registration and protection of archaeological artifacts, storage and display techniques, and collections management will be carried out at the Museum of Jordanian Heritage.

 

Outcomes

 

On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

-         Recognize the importance of the museum role in education, entertainment, and preservation of archaeological artifacts.

-         Recognize the most popular international, Arabic and Jordanian museums.

-         Record archaeological artifacts in the museum records.

-         Recognize presentation techniques of museum collections.

-         Describe museum objects and their management process.

-         Evaluate the museum environment controlling systems.

-         Recognize the importance of museum display in the preservation of museum artifacts.

-         Interpret the importance of temporary exhibitions in the museum.

-         Submit and present reports on the learnt topics on museum studies.

 



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