Department of Archaeology

Study Plan for the MA Degree in Archaeology

 

The Department of Archaeology offers a MA Degree in Archaeology on the completion of the following requirements:

 

The fulfillment of the conditions stated in the bylaws forwarding the MA degree in Archaeology.

 

Course requirements

A.    Obligatory courses (15 Credit Hours):

 

Course No.

Course Title

Credit Hours

Arch 601

Research Methods

3

Arch 610

Field Archaeology

3

Arch 629

Levant in the Ancient Ages (Special Topics)

3

Arch 630

Islamic Architecture and Arts/ Advanced

3

Arch 649

Classical Architecture and Arts/ Advanced

3

 

  1. Elective courses (9 Credit Hours) to be selected from the following groups:

Group A: (3 credit hour)

Course No.

Course Title

Credit Hours

Arch 660

Applied Sciences in Archaeology/ Advanced

3

Arch 661

Archaeological Materials Science and Technology/ Advanced

3

 

Group B: (6 credit hours)

Course No.

Course Title

Credit Hours

Arch 620

Selected Topics in Ancient Pottery

3

Arch 621

Settlement Patterns from Village to City

3

Arch 631

Islamic Urban Centers

3

Arch 632

Islamic Numismatics

3

Arch 633

Special Topics in Islamic Archaeology

3

Arch 640

Urban Centers and Trade Networks in the Classical Periods

3

Arch 643

The Nabataean Culture/ Advanced

3

Arch 648

Irrigation Systems and Agriculture in the Classical Periods

3

Arch 651

Old World Prehistory and Lithic Technology

3

Arch 662

Methods of Surveying and Dating in Archaeology

3

Arch 663

Scientific Analysis of Archaeological Materials

3

 

  1. 9 credit hours allocated for preparing the master's thesis and succeeding the oral exam. The thesis course for registration purposes appears as follows:

Course No.

Course Title

Credit Hours

Arch699A

THESIS

0

Arch699B

THESIS

3

Arch699C

THESIS

6

Arch699D

THESIS

9

 

MA Courses Description

 

Arch 601: Research Methods

This course aims at preparing the students for conducting research according to the international standards. Various theories of research methodologies, techniques and approaches are covered in this course. Topics such as research formulation and design, modeling, sampling, data processing, bibliography listing, and results presentation are highlighted in this course. The student will prepare his own research and all researches will be discussed.

Learning Outcomes:

The student will be able to learn:
 1. the importance of accurate scientific research in the field of graduate studies
2. Choose the appropriate subjects for research
3. Choose the appropriate scientific research methods for his research
4. The appropriate methods of data collection and analysis

 

Arch 610 Field Archaeology

This course provides field training for the students on the methods and techniques used in surveying and excavating of archaeological sites, documentation of sites and materials in-situ, conservation of archaeological materials, packaging, handling and transportation.

 

Learning Outcomes:

The student will be able:

  1. To apply the principals of recording and documenting of the excavated strata and archaeological materials.
  2. To master the surveying and excavating methods.
  3. To write scientific reports discussing the excavation results. 

 

Arch 620 Selected Topics in Ancient Pottery

This course presents an analytical descriptive study of the pottery assemblages ranging from ca. 6000 BC until AD 1516. It will concentrate on discussing the surface treatment, technique, fabric, form and a parallel study.

Learning Outcomes:

The student will be able:

  1. To learn and understand the pottery vessels making techniques.
  2. To distinguish the types (forms) of the pottery pots.
  3. To decide on the pottery vessels ages.
  4. To distinguish the surface treatment or decorations.

 

Arch 621 Settlement Patterns from Village to City

The course studies the development of social groups from early farming villages during the Neolithic and the Chalcolithic periods to the great urban civilizations of the Near East is to be studied.

After a general introduction to settlement patterns and the study of the spatial analysis of cities, numerous examples from the Ancient Near East are presented (Levant, Iraq and Egypt).

Learning Outcomes:

The student will be able:

  1. To learn about the physical nature (environment) of the archaeological sites related to the Neolithic and Chalcolithic periods.
  2. To analyze the excavated archaeological data at sites dated to the Neolithic and Chalcolithic periods.
  3. To understand the social, economic and thought development through the earliest village communities.
  4. To compare between the village and the first cities societies and way of life.

 

Arch 629 Levant in the Ancient Ages (Special Topics)

This course aims at presenting an introduction to the prehistory of the Levant starting from the Paleolithic through the Chalcolithic eras. It discusses the characteristics of each era as sites location and settlement patterns, architecture, art, ritual practices, and industries including stone (flint, basalt and others), bone and other materials culture.

 

Learning Outcomes:

The student will be able:

  1. To learn and understand the history and archaeology of the Levant during the Bronze and the Iron Ages.
  2. To compare between the information mentioned in the literary sources and those deduced from the uncovered archaeological remains.
  3. To know and master the theories of the establishing the "State" in the Ancient Near East.

 

Arch 630: Islamic Architecture and Arts/ Advanced

This course introduces the architecture and arts of the Islamic lands from the 7th c. rise of the Umayyad dynasty to the 19th c. expansion of the Ottoman Empire. By examining the socio-historical Sasanian and Byzantine contexts within which Islamic art and architecture developed, the course will provide a basic understanding of its major themes; applied Islamic arts and regional variations.

Course Objectives:

  1. Introduce students to the arts of Islamic architecture, to be familiar with the types and functions of various buildings, and how Muslims erected these monuments.
  2. Focusing, briefly in the evolution of religious, civil and military Islamic architecture, in addition to define of the Islamic applied arts.
  3. Develop Intellectual abilities of the student through giving them opportunities to express an opinion on the development of curriculum and methods of Islamic architecture, art and discuss the views of Orientalists in the evolution of these arts.

Learning Outcomes:

The student will be able:

  1. Explain the key components of Islam as a religious tradition, its principles, and its history; Define and analyze the purpose of Islamic art;
  2. Describe the materials and methods used in the creation of art and architecture that supports Muslim beliefs;
  3. Develop and use a vocabulary that specifically applies to Islamic art and architecture;
  4. Identify key monuments or works of art in the history of Islamic art;
  5. Discuss the various cultures, including pre-Islamic cultures, that influenced the development of Islamic art and architecture.

Arch 631: Islamic Urban Centers

 The objective of this course is to introduce the most important centers of urban civilization, especially Basra, Kufa, Fustat, Wasit, Baghdad and other cities of the Levant and the Maghreb in the Arab and Islamic world, in terms of location and architectural planning; by identifying the most important parts of the architecture that included within the area and its historical and cultural relations.

Course Objectives:

  1. Developing an understanding of the diversity in the history of Islamic Urban centers and societies
  2. Identifying major events and themes in early Arab-Islamic city History
  3. Engaging in exploring different types of historical evidence and how they shape urban history of Islam.

 

Learning Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Provide reasoned opinions regarding the major turning points in Islamic urban history and the reasons for their occurrence and the circumstances surrounding it and its sequences on the Islamic nation.
  2. Determine the pattern of interaction between Islamic civilization and world major civilizations, with the awareness of relationship of give and take between the two sides, whether in wartime or peacetime.
  3. Critically evaluate the Islamic scientific contributions in Natural Sciences and in Humanities and Social Sciences, evaluate what Muslim Scientists took, innovated, and transferred to other, and explain and discuss of the major additions of Muslims to science and knowledge.
  4. Acquire critical reading skill on a book of one course topic, and acquire group Discussion and dialogue skill, in addition to listen, express an opinion, and recognize from peers one book at least from each course topic, and attend group discussions in four important topics.

Arch 632: Islamic Numismatics

 This course provides a comprehensive study of the Islamic coins (dinar, dirham, and fils) from the beginning of Islam until the end of the Ottoman caliphate and the accompanying developments in both form and content. And the study of the economic and political conditions that affected the process of issuing coins as well as the course of the blazons, seals and Islamic heraldic, will be considered.

Course Objectives:

  1. The student will study, theoretical and practical sides of the development of Islamic monetary circulation system and the study of Islamic coins through the ages.
  2. Focusing, briefly in the evolution of Islamic coins and phrases and aphorisms that have appeared in various Islamic states.
  3. To develop student's ability to recognize the standards, regulations and conditions of implementation of minting coins.

 

Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the course, students are expected to:

  1. Identify the place and the period of coins issued in the Levant and neighboring countries, coins that may be found in archaeological excavations and museums.
  2. Discuss the historical context of these coins at the time of issuing.
  3. Deal with Islamic coins as circulated archaeological material and tangible evidence, and find out ways of minting and circulation periods.

 

Arch 633: Special Topics in Islamic Archaeology

This course discusses one of the topics related to Islamic archeology in an analytical scientific way to identify the factors of the development of art and Islamic architecture and the architectural and artistic styles that accompanied the emergence of Islam. The content of the course shall be determined by the course instructor and approved by the department council.

 

Course Objectives:

This course aims to:

- provide an overview of the origin and development of Islamic material culture.

- promote greater integration of archaeological and art historical methodologies.

- encourage a deeper awareness and appreciation of Islamic civilization.

 - inspire students to pursue a career in Islamic cultural heritage.

 

Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the course students will have acquired:

  1. A familiarity with the principal sites and monuments of the Islamic lands.
  2. An understanding of archaeological & art historical approaches to Islamic material culture.
  3. A greater awareness of the diverse peoples and lands of the Islamic world.
  4. An appreciation of the significance of Islamic civilization to world history

 

 

Arch 640: Urban Centers and Trade Networks in the Classical Periods

This course aims at studying the cities and trade routes in the classical periods. The course focuses on the description of the main cities, especially in the eastern region, the city's relationship with the surrounding areas, its association with other cities, and the identification of commercial, economic and agricultural activity of the eastern region in the classical periods. The most important commercial roads and commercial caravans stations, the topography of the cities located on these roads and their geography, their agricultural, industrial and artistic products will be identified.

Learning Outcomes:
The student will be able to learn:
1. To identify economic activity in the Middle East in classical periods
2. Identify the most important commercial roads and commercial caravan stations and their characteristics
3. Identify the commercial goods that were transported through these areas
4. Recognize the importance of trade in economic prosperity in the region during classical periods

 

Arch 643: The Nabataean Culture/ Advanced

This course will cover the various aspects of the Nabataean culture and the most important Nabataean sites. It will concentrate on the importance of this culture through their architecture, sculptures, arts, irrigation and water systems, farming, and trade. In this course examples of Nabataean architectural monuments, stone and clay sculptures will be thoroughly discussed. In addition, the course will emphasis on the effect of previous and contemporary culture on the Nabataeans, more light will be given to the economy and trade aspects that played a big role on the prosperity of the Nabataean culture.

Learning Outcomes:

The student will be able to learn:

  1. The importance of Nabataean culture
  2. The influence of other civilizations on the Nabataean culture through the technical and architectural elements
  3. The sources of prosperity of the Nabataean economy by focusing on trade
  4. The agricultural development and water systems and irrigation at the Nabataeans

 

Arch 648 Irrigation Systems and Agriculture in the Classical Periods

The course studies the irrigation and agricultural systems in the Classical periods, along with the water–supply systems such as channels, cisterns, dams, and pools. It will deal also with the agricultural production, the economical and agricultural conditions of each culture.

Learning Outcomes:
The student will be able to:

  1. Identify the importance of agriculture in classical periods
  2. Recognize the irrigation methods, and the agricultural products
  3. Recognize the water collecting and reserving methods

 

Arch 649: Classical Architecture and Arts/ Advanced

This course aims at studying the architecture and the arts in the classical periods in terms of the variety of architectural structures and architectural styles that were used in the construction of these monuments, in addition to studying the arts of various kinds, especially the arts of sculpture, fresco, mosaics and other arts. The focus will be on architectural and technical examples from the East, especially Jordan, Syria, Lebanon and Palestine. This course aims also at introducing the artistic and decorative elements used in the arts and architecture in the east how these elements were influenced by the products of Greek and Roman civilizations in Greece and Rome.

Learning Outcomes:

The student will be able to learn:
1. The general characters of  different types arts in classical periods
2. The different influences on the products of classical cultures
3. Artistic and decorative elements in classical periods

 

Arch 651 Old World Prehistories and Lithic Technology

This course will examine lithic tools, their technology, manufacturing techniques and morphology, from the Paleolithic Age until the historical era. The course could include practical training in manufacturing and usage of lithic tools.

 

Learning Outcomes:

  1. To explain the early industrial technologies of flint tools
  2. To name the function of the different flint tools
  3. To understand the documentation and dating methods of flint tools
  4. To explain the development and name the raw materials that used to produce flint tools through different periods

 

Arch 660: Applied Sciences in Archaeology/ Advanced              

This course aims at introducing the relation between archaeology and natural sciences such as Physics, Chemistry, Geology, etc. and using them to discover, study, date, and analyze archaeological materials, layers and sites of different periods. It also focuses on the fields of knowledge which resulted from the integration of natural sciences and archaeology.

Learning Outcomes:

The student should be able to

  1. Determine the relationship between the theories and techniques of natural sciences and archeology.
  2. Decide how to use this relationship in studying archaeological materials.
  3. Compare between the different applications of applied sciences in archaeology.

 

Arch 661: Archaeological Materials Science and Technology/ Advanced                     

The aim of the course is to examine the nature and basic composition of archaeological remains including pottery, glass, stone, metals, glass and organic materials. (In addition, ancient  manufacturing technologies and their development throughout ages will be covered. The course focuses on the identification of ancient materials and their production technologies based on their physical, mineralogical and chemical properties determined by scientific analyses.

Learning Outcomes:

The student should be able to

  1. Diagnose the nature of archaeological materials according to their physical, mineralogical and chemical properties.
  2. Distinguish between the different production technologies of archaeological materials.
  3. Apply scientific analyses to determine the raw materials and manufacturing technology used in the production of archaeological materials.

 

 

Arch 662: Methods of Surveying and Dating in Archaeology     

The course aims to study various methods used in finding archaeological sites and materials. It compares between traditional and new scientific techniques used in finding archaeological sites and materials. It also focuses on the relative and modern absolute dating methods used for dating archaeological materials, layers and sites such as: radiocarbon, dendrochronology, thermoluminescence, potassium-argon, …etc.   

 

Learning Outcomes:

The student should be able to

  1. Distinguish between the traditional and modern methods of surveying and discovering archaeological materials and sites.
  2. Recommend the proper survey method according to the site's conditions.
  3. Compare between the relative and absolute dating methods used in dating archaeological materials and sites.
  4. Decide which is the proper dating method based on the type and age of archaeological materials or sites.

 

 

Arch 663: Scientific Analysis of Archaeological Materials

The aim of the course is to study the scientific methods used in the analyses of archaeological materials including stone, ceramic, glass, metals …etc. using chemical, mineralogical, and thermal approaches, in order to collect all the data necessary about their use, raw materials, production technology, and provenance. This course provides a basic training to analyze some archaeological materials in the laboratories.

 

Learning Outcomes:

The student should be able to

  1. Distinguish between the scientific methods and techniques used in the analyses of archaeological materials
  2. Apply the proper scientific analytical method and technique to analyze archaeological materials according to their type and the question of the study.
  3. Provide conclusions and interpretations about the archaeological information that might be obtained via scientific analyses.

 

 

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